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lignicide: (n.) woodcutter

hi my name is lindsay. i'm pansexual, panromantic, and genderfluid (she/they). i'm from texas and i'm white and i'm 18 yrs old.
Sep 29 '14
vanessasaccone:

vanessasaccone:



I’m never sure how to feel when I’m at work. Young girls think I’m a cis male and start giggling and glancing towards me. I feel uncomfortable because I know what they’re thinking. Then when they come to purchase something and I start talking their faces drop. I can’t help but feel embarrassed and angry but there’s isn’t anything I can do about it.

vanessasaccone:

vanessasaccone:

I’m never sure how to feel when I’m at work. Young girls think I’m a cis male and start giggling and glancing towards me. I feel uncomfortable because I know what they’re thinking. Then when they come to purchase something and I start talking their faces drop. I can’t help but feel embarrassed and angry but there’s isn’t anything I can do about it.

Sep 29 '14

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

Sep 29 '14

(Source: vausemern)

Sep 29 '14
Sep 29 '14

(Source: lolgifs.net)

Sep 29 '14
timelordblogging:

allofmylovetess:

dlubes:

clarknokent:

You know she regrets this lmao

watch the whole video. no way she does.

It’s your juicy jewel of flavor, Ring Pop!

WATCH THE FUCKING VIDEO

timelordblogging:

allofmylovetess:

dlubes:

clarknokent:

You know she regrets this lmao

watch the whole video. no way she does.

It’s your juicy jewel of flavor, Ring Pop!

WATCH THE FUCKING VIDEO

(Source: shogunofyellow)

Sep 29 '14

aktx:

tarntino:

me: *sees a white boy* *locks my car doors*

white boy: *knocks on window* what would you be doing if I was in there with you ;)

Sep 29 '14

fueledbyrydenn:

superhighschoollevelgay:

tiny21dancer:

“I guess your grades are more important to you than your morals are,” my English teacher spits out, lecturing our class about cheating that’s been going on in the school.

My classmates and I exchange glances. Well, yeah, we all seem to be thinking together. Isn’t that what they’ve been showing us since middle school?

#also that our grades are more important #than ourselves.

and our mental and physical health.

(Source: dersedaydreaming)

Sep 29 '14
uppityfatty:

This is a life-size pre-cast clay sculpture of a naked fat woman. The model is Julie Srika. The sculptor is Ramon Sierra. I think it’s beautiful and important. Breathtaking, even. Two days ago I shared it on Facebook, with the permission of both the model and the artist. Many people responded to it as I did. Facebook then deleted the thread and removed the photo from the model’s account, citing it as being in violation of their “community standards.” Appeals to Facebook have yet to be answered.
I think this is a disturbing anti-art stance, particularly vexing, considering Facebook allows far more sexually suggestive photos and sanctions pages designed to promote bigotry and bullying. Yet an amazing piece of art depicting a fat woman in proud non-sexual repose must go.
So while this is not the traditional fare for Uppity Fatty, I’m posting it here so more people can see it without the small-minded interference of Facebook’s double-standards.
~ Substantia Jones

UPDATE ON CLAYGATE: I don’t know if this represents a caving on the part of Facebook, or merely an oversight, and I certainly don’t know if it’s an “our voices were heard, hizzah!” thing, but the model depicted in the sculpture has just tried reposting the image to her account for a third time, and this time it wasn’t taken down. So for now… a provisional hizzah! And thanks for getting cheesed off with me!

uppityfatty:

This is a life-size pre-cast clay sculpture of a naked fat woman. The model is Julie Srika. The sculptor is Ramon Sierra. I think it’s beautiful and important. Breathtaking, even. Two days ago I shared it on Facebook, with the permission of both the model and the artist. Many people responded to it as I did. Facebook then deleted the thread and removed the photo from the model’s account, citing it as being in violation of their “community standards.” Appeals to Facebook have yet to be answered.

I think this is a disturbing anti-art stance, particularly vexing, considering Facebook allows far more sexually suggestive photos and sanctions pages designed to promote bigotry and bullying. Yet an amazing piece of art depicting a fat woman in proud non-sexual repose must go.

So while this is not the traditional fare for Uppity Fatty, I’m posting it here so more people can see it without the small-minded interference of Facebook’s double-standards.

~ Substantia Jones

UPDATE ON CLAYGATE: I don’t know if this represents a caving on the part of Facebook, or merely an oversight, and I certainly don’t know if it’s an “our voices were heard, hizzah!” thing, but the model depicted in the sculpture has just tried reposting the image to her account for a third time, and this time it wasn’t taken down. So for now… a provisional hizzah! And thanks for getting cheesed off with me!

Sep 29 '14

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police gas protesters in Hong Kong. Part 1.

Part 2

Sep 29 '14

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police gas protesters in Hong Kong. Part 2.

Part 1

Sep 29 '14

morganoperandi:

allthebeautifulthings9828:

Guys, look. They finally made a baby stroller for wheelchair-bound mothers. This is so important.

My wife is a physical therapist.  She started tearing up when I showed this to her.

Sep 29 '14
ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

Sep 29 '14
little-black-bear:

Did I ever mention I fucking love visual poetry? Because I fucking love visual poetry.

little-black-bear:

Did I ever mention I fucking love visual poetry? Because I fucking love visual poetry.

(Source: bermira)

Sep 29 '14

theyreoutofcontrol:

but serious question: why was harry wearing a cape for the first three years of school?

(Source: justaspell)